Tag Archives: Your Blues Ain’t Sweet Like Mine

‘Your Blues Ain’t Sweet Like Mine’ tackles tough talk about race in USA


No matter how much you study the Harlem Renaissance or the Great Migration, read books by famous black authors or listen to Thelonius Monk, you will not really know what it is like to be black in America unless you are black.

But Judith, an earnest, well-educated white woman in Ruben Santiago-Hudson‘s exciting new play “Your Blues Ain’t Sweet Like Mine,” believes she can.  Zeke, a black man working at a homeless shelter, knows that she can not.

This is the fulcrum on which this play revolves. Like an approaching  tornado, the 100-minute play begins calmly. But soon we feel a change in the air as an ill wind begins to pick up. Before you know it the tempest hits full force — metaphorically twisting words and meanings and intent — before it quickly passes leaving bewilderment and resentment in its wake. It’s a wild ride that ends too quickly and without resolution.

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