TCM salutes Marx Brothers today

This scene, one of the most famous comedy scenes of all time, was developed with participation of silent comedy great, then gag writer, Buster Keaton who took inspiration from a simpler precursor in his own film, "The Cameraman," according to Wikipedia.
One of the most famous comedy scenes of all time, was developed with participation of silent comedy great Buster Keaton.

Haven’t see  the iconic “stateroom scene” from “A Night at the Opera” in a while. Catch it tonight as part of a day-long to the Marx Brothers during TCM’s month-long Summer Under the Stars.

Just watched Dick Cavett’s interview with Groucho in which he sang  “Lydia, the Tattooed Lady,” the 1939 song by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg from “At the Circus.” It became just one of his signature songs. Watch the interview below.

If you’ve read this far, I know you know The Marx Brothers were stars of  vaudeville, Broadway, and  motion pictures from 1905 to 1949. Five of the Marx Brothers’ 13 feature films were selected by the American Film Institute (AFI) as among the top 100 comedy films, with two of them (“Duck Soup” and “A Night at the Opera”) in the top 12. The brothers were included in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Stars list of the most significant screen legends, the only performers to be inducted collectively.

As I write this, TCM’s schedule for the rest of the day is:

— 4:30 p.m., “The Cocoanuts,” (1929)

— 6:15 p.m., “Animal Crackers,” (1930)

— 8 p.m., “Monkey Business,” (1931)

— 9:30 p.m., “Horse Feathers” (1932)

— 10:45 p.m., “Duck Soup” (1933)

— Midnight, “A Night at the Opera” (1935)

— 2 a.m., “A Day at the Races” (1937)

 

 

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