Maggie Smith is done with the Dowager Countess

Maggie Smith (shown here as the Dowager Countess) says the sixth season of "Downton Abbey" will be her last, whether to not the series continues beyond 2016. (Nick Briggs/Carnival Film & Television for Masterpiece)
Maggie Smith (shown here as the Dowager Countess) says the sixth season of “Downton Abbey” will be her last, whether or not the series continues beyond 2016. (Nick Briggs/Carnival Film & Television for Masterpiece)

Maggie Smith, 80, began as a stage actress so I feel perfectly justified in sharing here she is done playing the Dowager Countess after the next season of “Downton Abbey,” whether it’s the final season or not.

Sure going to miss those barbed swipes  she delivers, oh, so well. Of course, if she continues making movies, such as the “Marigold Hotel” series, we’ll still hear plenty of her quips. And there’s always the “Harry Potter” moves to watch again (except for maybe the last two).

In an interview with The (London) Sunday Times, “They say this is the last one, and I can’t see how it could go on,” Smith, 80, said referring to the upcoming season six. (She thinks the Countess “must be 110 by now,” she told the Times.)

The show’s creator Julian Fellowes and executive producer Gareth Neame haven’t confirmed one way or the other if the sixth season is the last. Besides, it’s no longer their call.

In an interview with The New York Times published today, Fellowes said, “It’s not really my decision. I don’t own ‘Downton Abbey’ now. NBC Universal owns ‘Downton Abbey.’ So I could walk away, but I wouldn’t walk away. It’s too much my baby. It won’t go on forever — I’m not a believer in that. But I can’t immediately now tell you where the end will be.”

Fellowes is writing a pilot for a proposed NBC drama  “The Gilded Age” set in New York in the 19th century.

For more info on Maggie Smith, who for some will always be remembered for her Academy Award-winning performance in  “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie” for some and for others the “Harry Potter” series of films, click here. (It’s a generational thing.)

 

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